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she never expected find were the men..

Escorpion En El Mapa

  10/02/2012       ladna      0 Comments

La mayor parte de los poemas de este cuaderno fueron concebidos como elementos de un conjunto en el que cada uno funcionara de la misma manera que las palabras en una oracion, pero sin que la cohesion resultara en claustrofobia, de manera que cada pieza podia ser percibida tambien fuera de esa estructura, a solas, aunque su significado cambiara de algun modo. De ahi que el uso de la figura biblica de Jonas -que atraviesa casi todo el poemario- no sea precisamente una clave, o en todo caso no seria sino otra clave mas, que no concentra en si misma el enorme poder alegorico que si posee el Libro de Jonas en el Antiguo Testamento.

Science

Ransom, Revenge, and Heroic Identity in the Iliad

  10/02/2012       seriysem10      0 Comments

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Ransom, Revenge, and Heroic Identity in the Iliad
 
by
Donna F. Wilson

Wilson examines the nature of compensation--ransom and revenge--in the liad, offering a fundamentally new reading of the quarrel between Agamemnon and Achilles. She presents a detailed anthropology of compensation in Homer, located in the wider context of agonistic exchange, to demonstrate how the struggle over definitions is a central feature of elite competition for status in the zero-sum and fluid ranking system of Homeric society. The study thus asserts the integral role of compensation in the traditional, cultural and poetic matrix of this foundational epic.

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Supersoul

  10/02/2012       futmen      0 Comments

A new consciousness is emerging on planet earth. Huge swathes of the human population are waking up to the incredible truth of who and what we really are. And now the next pieces of the jigsaw reveal a power in each of us way beyond our wildest imaginings... the power of our SUPERSOUL. In the latter decades of the twentieth century a degree of spiritual consensus emerged. It centred around the idea that we all have a soul that survives our physical death; that lives many lives to gain a rich variety of experience; and that will at some point have overcome the multitude of challenges the human experience has to offer, and move on to grow in other ways in other realms. Some have taken a different tack and focussed more on ideas of illusion and addiction, but arguably their influence has remained more on the fringe. This worldview has served us well as the tide of the new consciousness has gathered momentum. But what if it only scratches the surface of an underlying reality that is far more complex and intriguing? The clues have been available, scattered here and there, for decades. In Robert Monroes pioneering journeys out of his body, when he met with supreme intelligences that he eventually realized were only other aspects of himself. In Jane Roberts seminal Seth channelings, which revealed that he and she were part of the same oversoul. And in the widely channelled messages from the group entity Michael, who describe themselves as comprised of many individual soul fragments. All these sources remain hugely popular, yet somehow the vital clues they left for us have remained somewhat overlooked. But now they can be pulled together into a worldview potentially enhanced by scientists who propose a fundamentally holographic and digital reality. A radical worldview that opens up huge new possibilities for us all as we collectively pioneer the most radical change in human consciousness ever witnessed on planet earth.

Science

0 Ganso Tanso e o Pato Pateta brincam � s escondidas

  10/02/2012       zaec2003      0 Comments

Silly Goose and Dizzy Duck Play Hide and Seek by Sally Grindley, Adrian EdwardsSilly Goose and Dizzy Duck Play Hide and Seek is a book that had my little ones begging for repeated readings. The pictures are bright and colorful and the characters keep my kids entertained the whole time while I was reading it. Its easy. Its a great beginners book if youre interested in teaching your children to read. I actually purchased this book this week to add to our library collection. Children of all ages will enjoy this book my infants even giggled as I was reading the story. Silly Goose and Dizzy Duck are good friends and try to outwit Clever Fox in a game of hide and seek. As Clever Fox counts to ten, the friends try to find hiding places. When I read this book to my children I had made it into a puppet show for my kids and they really enjoyed it mean laughing and giggling the whole time. I had a puppet fox, goose, and a duck and as I was telling the story I was acting the story out with characters. After the story the kids was able to remember everything that took place when I asked them.

Science

How to Date a Nerd(How To #1)

  10/02/2012       heinzerg      0 Comments

From Amazon.com bestselling author Cassie Mae comes HOW TO DATE A NERD, the first in a hilarious and heartwarming series of HOW TO books. Next in the series are: HOW TO SEDUCE A BAND GEEK and HOW TO HOOK A BOOKWORM! OMG. OMG. OMG. Hilarious. I heart this book so much. -- Karen Jensen This book is so freaking awesome. I cant wait to read the next one. -- Mary Bean As an adult who reads Young Adult books, this one is refreshing and funny. I want to read Cassies other books. -- Anonymous Zoe has a great pair of legs, perky boobs, and wears exactly what she needs to show it all off. She works hard for the easy sleazy ‘you only wish you were me’ reputation, burying who she really is—an all-out nerd. The only time Zoe gets to be herself is when she hides under her comforter to read X-Men comics, sending jealousy stabs at everyone who attends Comic-Con. Keeping up her popular rep is too important, and she’s so damn insecure to care about the consequences. But when Zoe’s sister takes her car for a ‘crash and burn into a tree’ joyride, her parents get her a replacement. A manual. Something she doesn’t know how to operate, but her next door neighbor Zak sure as heck does. Zak’s a geek to the core, shunned by everyone in school for playing Dungeons and Dragons at lunch and wearing “Use the Force” t-shirts. And Zoe’s got it bad for the boy. Only Zak doesn’t want Popular Zoe. He wants Geek Zoe. She has to shove her insecurities and the fear of dropping a few rungs on the social ladder aside to prove to Zak who she really is and who she wants to be… if she can figure it out herself.

Science

Make Way for Ducklings

  10/02/2012       simxristos6674      0 Comments

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Make Way for Ducklings
 
by
Robert McCloskey

Make Way for Ducklings begins with Mr. and Mrs. Mallard looking for a place to call home so they can settle down and start a family. After flying around and rejecting locations for various reasons, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard take a break and land at the Boston Public Garden. Most of their experiences at the BPG are promising, but after both nearly get run over by a child on a bicycle, Mrs. Mallard decides it would not be the ideal place to start a family — at least not yet. So Mr. and Mrs. Mallard end up settling on an island in the Charles River — this is where their eight ducklings hatch. After this, Mr. Mallard goes back to the BPG and tells Mrs. Mallard to meet him there in a week. During this time, Mrs. Mallard teaches her ducklings how swim, march in a row, and avoid dangers such as bicycles and cars. After seven days, Mrs. Mallard and the ducklings walk up to dry land and attempt to cross the street. What follows next is a most charming story of how the police help “escort” Mrs. Mallard and her eight ducklings to the Boston Public Garden so she can be reunited with Mr. Mallard and, of course, all live happily ever after.(My only criticism of the story line is this: I don’t understand why the Boston Public Gardens was deemed an unfit place to build a nest, lay eggs and have them hatch because a mere seven days after the ducklings hatch, Mrs Mallard and the eight ducklings return to the BPG. I know this is a children’s picture book, and sometimes the duration of events are condensed, but I do find it doubtful that in just seven days Mrs. Mallard was able to teach her ducklings “everything” they would need to know to travel safely to and be safe at the Boston Public Gardens.)Make Way for Ducklings is set in Boston, Massachusetts. I’m sure people who call (or once called) Boston their home, will have fun seeing streets and landmarks from their home town in the story. Such places include: the Boston Public Garden (of course!), Beacon Hill, the State House, Louisburg Square, the Charles River, Mount Vernon Street, the Corner Book Shop, Charles Street, and Beacon Street. Those living in Boston now can note which features of the 1941 cityscape have changed or remained the same — certainly the cars look different now!The art is truly lovely — McCloskey originally wanted full-color illustrations (more on that below), but the brown ink is so warm and natural and just so perfect. The illustrations of the ducks and their environment are also very true-to-life. Some of the illustrations are done from an aerial perspective — readers can see Mr. and Mrs. Mallard flying and looking down at the city below. Sometimes the city looks closer or farther away depending on how high Mr. and Mrs. Mallard are flying — it’s quite a special touch.The front end papers shows the progress of one duckling hatching from an egg, but illustration isn’t that large and there is still a lot of “white space” on the front end papers — the rear end papers are blank. As someone who adores printed end papers, I feel this was a missed opportunity. I know printed end papers are an added expense (and maybe this wasn’t a common thing to do back in 1941), but it would have been over-the-top terrific to have the end papers feature a map of Boston or even just more illustrations of ducklings hatching from eggs.Overall, Make Way for Ducklings is a great story with stunning natural-looking art. I’m not sure if I ever read Make Way for Ducklings as a child — I discovered this new-to-me title while reading 100 Best Books for Children: A Parents Guide to Making the Right Choices for Your Young Reader, Toddler to Preteen (my review here). In 100 BBFC, Silvey relates the stories behind the stories and the one for Make Way for Ducklings was my favorite. Below is the scoop on the inspiration for the story, the artistic process, and some production details.As an art student spending at the Boston Public Garden drawing, McCloskey heard about a family of ducks who had stopped traffic on Beacon Street. He was charmed by this bit of news and began to write a story based on this true event. However, McCloskey had difficulty with the illustrations — specifically the ducks. As Silvey relates:“Although the story line emerged with some clarity, McCloskey soon found he could neither think like a duck nor draw one. After studying mallards for two years at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, he purchased ducks, which he brought home to a Greenwich Village apartment and kept in the bathtub. Raising a terrible racket, the ducks woke up at the break of day; McCloskey followed them around with a Kleenex in one hand and a sketchpad in the other. When he couldn’t get them to sit still long enough, he actually gave them wine to drink. Eventually all his diligence paid off in the final drawings.” (pages 30 – 31)I just love how obsessed (but in a good way) McCloskey was about getting his illustrations to look as perfect and true-to-life as they could. It’s truly hard to believe with illustrations like this that he ever had trouble thinking like a duck or drawing one!The Make Way for Ducklings vignette from 100 BBFC is filled with all sorts of other intriguing behind-the-scenes details. For example, McCloskey wanted the book to be printed in full-color. However, this proved pricey and also was not a financial risk the publisher wanted to take on a new author/illustrator. Thus the cover is green and the illustrations are done in brown ink. Another tidbit shares the original names of the ducks: “Mary, Martha, Phillys, Theodore, Beatrice, Alice, George, and John.” In the final edition the duck names have been changed to: “Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Ouack, Pack, and Quack.”On the 150th anniversary of the Boston Public Garden (October 4, 1987) bronze statues were installed near the gates made famous by the book. (Statue by Nancy Schön)all of my reviews can be found at www.isniffbooks.wordpress.com

Science

National Comics: Looker #1

  10/02/2012       nikibiki      0 Comments

Edginton sees part of the key to his success coming from good relationships with artists, especially DIsraeli and Steve Yeowell as well as Steve Pugh and Mike Collins. He is best known for his steampunk/alternative history work (often with the artist DIsraeli) and is the co-creator of Scarlet Traces, a sequel to their adaptation of H.G. Wells The War of the Worlds. With 2000 AD we has written Leviathan, Stickleback and, with art by Steve Yeowell, The Red Seas as well as one-off serials such as American Gothic (2005).His stories often have a torturous gestation. Scarlet Traces was an idea he had when first reading The War of the Worlds, its first few instalments appeared on Cool Beans website, before being serialised in the Judge Dredd Megazine. Also The Red Seas was initially going to be drawn by Phil Winslade and be the final release by Epic but Winslade was still tied up with Goddess and when ideas for replacement artists were rejected Epic was finally wound up - the series only re-emerging when Edginton was pitching ideas to Matt Smith at the start of his 2000 AD career.With DIsraeli he has created a number of new series including Stickleback, a tale of a strange villain in an alternative Victorian London, and Gothic, which he describes as Mary Shelleys Doc Savage. With Simon Davis he recently worked on a survival horror series, Stone Island, and he has also produced a comic version of the computer game Hellgate: London with Steve Pugh.He is currently working on a dinosaurs and cowboys story called Sixgun Logic. Also as part of Top Cows Pilot Season he has written an Angelus one-shot.http://comicbookdb.com/creator.php?ID...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Edgi...

Science

Conscience and the Common Good: Reclaiming the Space Between Person and State

  10/02/2012       smolyaaion      0 Comments

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Conscience and the Common Good: Reclaiming the Space Between Person and State
 
by
Robert K. Vischer

I started this book, which I got on interlibrary loan from the Lafayette Parish Library, back at the end of September; and it really did take me more than a month to read, not only because I was doing other things during the month of October (like being on a ten-day vacation), but because this is by no means an easy read. I found it greatly rewarding, though, and well worth the effort it took me to read it; after all, it’s a rare person who does not at times have his or her conscience come up against what the State or Government has currently mandated is permissible.After the Introduction (I also recommend the Acknowledgments, especially the last sentence of them), the author divides his work into two parts. Part I considers The Relational Dimension of Conscience, and considers that relational dimension in four chapters dealing with Conscience in Law, Conscience and the Person, Consicences’ Claims, and Conscience and the Common Good. The second Part considers Implications of how the Relational Dimension of Conscience works out in chapters dealing with Voluntary Associations, Pharmacies, Corporations, Schools, Families, and The Legal Profession. Finally, everything is pretty well summed up in the Conclusion.The author feels that since the operation of conscience is relational, in that even lonely individualists exist only in community (you cannot recognize the beat of a different drum until you know what the regular drum sounds like), in most cases (with signal exceptions) the State should act only to ensure a fair marketplace for the operation of conscience. He mentions cases in which independent pharmacists have refused to dispense certain medications, and notes that such pharmacists should be allowed to follow the dictates of their consciences, so long as any given person wishing to obtain that particular prescription can do so at another nearby pharmacy. The State should only step in if there is a lack of pharmacies in the area, so that leaving results to the marketplace would not work.The signal exceptions to letting the marketplace make the final determination (of, for example, if an independent pharmacist can remain in business when it is known that he or she will not fill certain prescriptions) are in the broad areas of employment and housing, and in the relational dimensions of The Family and of the Legal Profession. In the case of the Family, ordinarily dependent members have no exit option (children can not generally opt out of a family), and so the Marketplace cannot be the ground on which conscience is decided; and in the Legal Profession, judges (and to a lesser extent, lawyers) cannot unilaterally decide whether or not they will uphold the current Laws. (The author points out that lawyers should not be mere technicians, helping their clients to achieve a given result; they can, and should, let it be know what their feelings of conscience are, if applicable, in any given legal case. Judges, on the other hand, should uphold the law, since one cannot use the marketplace to get a different judge to hear any given case; but judges can, and do, interject their feelings of conscience in the opinions that they interject into their decisions.I very much enjoyed this book, and I know that the Lafayette Public Library will very much enjoy getting it back; and I am willing to pay the fine for having the book past the due date, whatever it might be.

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